Wait for it  – it will just blow your socks off . . . . Ha!  So, anyway, last weekend was weird, I never get used to changing the clocks.  I came to the conclusion many years ago that they do it just because they can.  It’s a power thing.  I’m sure it is men (don’t go off on me – I don’t hate men, I just know what is going on – men run the world) and they can’t really control the sun, so they do the next best thing they can – make every freakin’ one of us 350 million Americans turn our clocks back.  I’m sure there are several someone’s out there who really get off on that. 

So anyway, in addition to that, which takes me at least a week to adjust to the time change, I got some minor things accomplished, of which I am overly proud, I’m sure.  First off, I have this 15 year old Ford Escort wagon that I like a lot. First, it was free, you can’t beat the price.  Second, it only has about 125,000 miles on it, which is good for a 15 year old car.  Second, it was only driven by an elderly couple on short trips to the grocery store and occassional trips to the country.  I know, because it was my parents car. 

The reason I ended up with it is that my dad passed away, then mom’s eyesight got so bad it was hazerdous for her to drive, so she passed the car on to me.  This is a great little car – underpowered, its true, but let me tell the reasons I like it. 

First off, you can cram a really lot of stuff into this car.  The back seats fold down and I can put my road bike (bicycle, not motorbike) into the back, which is great because its much safer there than hanging off the back, where maybe it could be stolen. I’ve moved with this car, and I can cram a lot of boxes in the back.  Also, lumber.  I have bought 2×4’s and other things for home projects and most of them fit into the back. 

What doesn’t fit inside can be tied to the roof.  Dad used to carry a kayak and a canoe on the top. 

Well, that was a long intro on what I did this weekend, but what I actually did to the car is repair a panel that is underneath, in the front, right under the bumper.  It had torn off years ago when dad was still with us, and I remember him crawling under there and drilling some holes and reattaching it.  It is positioned just right so that when you pull into a parking space, the thing hits the curb and then when you back out, it pulls on this panel and eventually, it tears off.

A couple of weeks ago it came off again on one side, and I was driving around with that thing hanging down.  It just looked really tacky.  When I drove 50 or more it would vibrate and make a thrumbing noise.  I was concerned that it would come clear off and possible fly into another car.  Or more likely just come off and be gone forever. 

One of the problems with a car this old is, you can’t get parts for it.  Last year the drivers side visor broke and was hanging in my face.  Impossible to drive with it like that, but try driving a car that doesn’t have a shade visor on the drivers side.  I couldn’t buy a new one, and I was told to get one from a junk yard.  I just decided to make one, which I did using the old broken one for a pattern.  Mine doesn’t look great, but it works fine and was basically free. 

Anyway, on Saturday I crawled under the car and took a close look at the panel that was loose on one side.  I decided I could drill a hole through the panel and through a piece of metal down there and just screw a tight fitting screw in to hold it together.  It looked like that is what dad had done in the past. 

Me -  working on my car

Me - working on my car

So I did it!  I was so proud of myself.  A small thing you might say, but to fix it myself felt really good.

Ok, one other thing:  I have a window sill in my bathroom that has been driving me nuts since I bought the house.  The room is white, but this stupid window frame is dark brown.  I finally said “Enough!”.  I sanded and painted it a glossy white this weekend, and it looks SO MUCH better in there. 

Sometimes it is the little things that make a big difference!

The hamster is always learning and thinking.

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